All posts tagged PleXBMC

2014-09-26 20.06.44-1

Neighbor cat napping in my Laz-E-Boy. Click pic to flip.

The following is a cautionary tale about how far some home theater enthusiasts may go to get things just right. It’s also to document a solution for myself and anyone else. It won’t be to everyone’s interest.

You don’t need to be into this kind of thing to have a good home theater setup. A Roku box can deliver paid services like Netflix as well as free content like Crackle, YouTube, and your own content on the Plex Channel. Many of the cord-cutting tips here require more awareness and will than technical knowledge to execute.

Some of us can’t leave well enough alone. Others, like Albert (above), are content to simply enjoy home theater with friends and family.

You won’t believe what I had to do to get a Context menu button for my Raspberry Pi media computer onto my Logitech Harmony 890 remote.

To navigate optimally through the media menus in RaspBMC (the Pi operating system I use), a Context button is desirable. This is especially true if you use PleXBMC, a beta software add-on that lets the Pi become a Plex client.

To control the Pi without keyboard and mouse, I originally bought a $5 IR dongle with remote. I plugged the dongle into the Pi, which it recognized. I added a Chinavasion CVSB-983 “device” to the Harmony remote which allowed me to map the basic play/pause/navigate-type functions.  That way, I could use the Harmony instead of the cheapo remote.
The Android XBMC remote app does have a “Context”-type button (like a right-click on Windows). It works fine on RaspBMC and PleXBMC. But I usually use the Harmony remote rather than the smartphone app.
(*Later note: XBMC has been renamed “Kodi”, and OSMC has superseded Raspbmc; in my new comment below, I added a new, much simpler way to add the Context button under OSMC.)
So after considerable googling (especially here and here), I plugged the dongle into my Windows PC (which it recognized), aimed the cheapo at it, and used free software ShowKey to find out what code was being sent when I pressed a useless yellow button.
ShowKey translated it as Ctrl-Alt-4, and gave the XML code, which could be modified for the Pi:
<four mod=”ctrl,alt”>Notification(Key, four, 3)</four>
2014-09-29 22.53.18

And there it is.

This button was simulating a Ctrl-Alt-4 on a keyboard, which my Windows computer was configured to interpret as some kind of notification. I changed the code snippet in my Notepad to this:
<four mod=”ctrl,alt”>ContextMenu</four>
Now FTPing into the Pi with WinSCP/Notepad++, I copied the keyboard.xml file from deep in the OS (/opt/xbmc-bcm/xbmc-bin/share/xbmc/system/keymaps) to a userdata area (/home/pi/.xbmc/userdata/keymaps), so that the new copy would supersede the original. Then in the Global/Keyboard area of the .xml file, I pasted in the above code (make sure the double quotes are non-italicized), so that a push of the yellow button would be interpreted by the Pi as a command to pop up a context menu . After the Pi was rebooted, the cheap remote had a working yellow Context button.
Once I added a soft button to the Harmony to send the yellow key IR codes, I had a context key on the Harmony!
Sometimes the little things are the most satisfying.