PleXBMC

All posts tagged PleXBMC

kodirecent

The new Plex beta addon for Kodi as seen on our 65″ TV. (Click to enlarge.)

Plex is a great free way to deliver local music/TV/movie content from your computer(s) to your TVs, smartphones, tablets, and browsers.

There are free Plex apps on several of our media devices: the Roku boxes, smartphone/Chromecast, and TiVo.

But my first Plex app was the unofficial PleXBMC addon for my $35 Raspberry Pi computer, running on free Raspbmc media center software.

Raspbmc was an adaptation of XBMC (Xbox Media Center) software for the Pi. XBMC was later renamed Kodi.

Today, Raspbmc has become OSMC (Open Source Media Center), and is still based on Kodi. The PleXBMC addon still works, though the developer has not updated it in awhile.

Now there is an official Plex for Kodi addon. It is still in beta, and is currently available only to PlexPass holders.

Here is a preview.

I am also taking this opportunity to show how I have set Plex up to organize my Windows-automated online recordings of the locally-produced weekend KWGS music shows (see the previous cord-cutting post)

Read on after the screenshots…

folksaladkodi

My Christmas recording of “The Folk Sampler”. I added the pix from KWGS’ and Mike Flynn’s websites.

folksaladkodi

Christmas “Folk Salad”. That is my own simple naming convention for the recordings.

allthisjazzkodi

Christmas Eve “All This Jazz”. The AAC+ format provides the best sound for the 56Kbps bandwidth.

swingonthiskodi

Christmas Eve “Swing On This”. Grabbed the nice background shot from the internet.


How to organize home-recorded radio shows for Plex:

I will demonstrate by adding my KWGS recordings of “Jazz Night in America” to Plex.

They are on my Windows Desktop in a folder called 1JazzNightInAmerica, with names like JNIA20150704.mp3.

For Plex, each .mp3 needs to be in a separate folder, so that Plex will see them as “albums”. We will name each folder the same as the .mp3 name. My simple naming convention allows them to be put in order by date.

Right-click an .mp3 in Windows Explorer, select “Rename” from the context menu, and use Ctrl-C to copy the show name. Then right-click on the leftmost space within the right pane of Explorer, create a New Folder, then do Ctrl-V to paste in the name of the show. Finally, move the .mp3 into the new folder of the same name. Do this for all the .mp3s.

jniamp3s-=========>>jniafolders

I created a new folder in Windows Explorer under “Music” called “Jazz Night in America (KWGS)” to be consistent with the naming of the other KWGS shows. (I configured Plex to look for new music in the Music folder when I installed it on this PC.)

Now I move one of the folders from 1JazzNightInAmerica into it.

Plex will detect it eventually, but to snap it up, I tell Plex to Update Libraries. Now I see an [Unknown Artist]/[Unknown Album] under “Recently Added Music”. I ignore it for now and go to my Music Library on Plex where I see a list of artists. Scroll down and find “Unknown Artist”. This will now be renamed.

Click the pencil icon for the [Unknown Artist] to edit. Type “Jazz Night in America (KWGS)” into the Artist slot. I copy and paste that same text into the “Sort Artist” field as well. You may, if you wish, add genre Tags (I selected “Jazz” and “Contemporary Jazz”).

You may also add a Poster image and a Background image for this artist. I usually look for official images associated with the show. You need only enter the URL of an image and it will be imported into Plex (but go ahead and save them to your PC as well for future use). I found a photo of host Christian McBride with his bass, and the JNIA logo to use as the background.

I now have a new “Artist” listed as “Jazz Night in America (KWGS)”. Click that artist icon. This artist has one [Unknown Album] so far. Edit the album by clicking the pencil icon on it.

The path to the .mp3 is visible under the Info tab. Copy the intended album name from the path, in this case, “JNIA20150704”. Paste it into both the Album and Sort Album slots under the General tab.

Click to enlarge.

(Optionally, you may also wish to add the same image you used for the artist Poster above; it must already be saved on your PC to do this. Plex uses it for display in some views if it is there. I found that if I added the image to this first album, Plex added it to the rest of the albums I added later.)

I now have a new Artist with one properly named Album to his credit.

At this point, I cut and paste the remaining folders from the Desktop folder into Music/Jazz Night in America (KWGS) folder.

I then tell Plex to Update the Music Library again. When complete, Recently Added Music shows a bunch of new [Unknown Artist]/[Unknown Albums].

You must edit each one, but it is easier this time. For Artist, just type in “Ja”, which will be sufficient to bring up a small list of matching artists from your library. Select “Jazz Night in America (KWGS)”. Click the Info tab and copy the name of this album (e.g., JNIA20150711) from the path, and paste it into Album and Sort Album under the General tab. Save Changes.

The latter process was a bit laborious, since I had so many shows already recorded. It’s not so much work if you are just beginning to record a weekly show.

Here is Mr. McBride and his shows. Now I can go to any of my devices with Plex and listen!

I hope this is helpful to someone, somewhere.

jniaplexview

Browser view of “Jazz Night in America (KWGS)” in Plex, with all the shows (“albums”) I previously recorded. All are now available to my Plex apps on Roku, smartphone, TiVo, Chromecast, Raspberry Pi. (Click to enlarge)

Screenshot of our 65" TV playing "Sonik Re-Entry" via the PleXBMC addon in OSMC/Kodi

Screenshot from our 65″ TV while playing “Sonik Re-Entry” on my $35 Raspberry Pi media computer.

This is a post where both sides of this website (vintage local TV and cord-cutting) converge.

Drive-in theatre maven Wesley Horton recently found an ad in the Nov. 10, 1967 Stillwater News Press for the Channel 2 Saturday night sci-fi/horror movie program, “Fantastic Theatre“, and sent me a copy. I finally got to see again the logo created by the Channel 2 artist!

1967 ad

1967 ad. Click to enlarge.

In early 1999, I had identified the show’s creepy electronic theme as “Sonik Re-Entry” by sending a .wav file of me trying to “sing” the instrumental melody to a couple of experts on early electronic music.

Once identified, I ordered a two-fer CD with the album it was taken from, “Song of the Second Moon” by Tom Dissevelt and Kid Baltan, plus Russ Garcia’s “Fantastica”. I later discovered that Channel 8’s “Plenty Scary Movie” promo used music from this bonus album, so it was a great deal.

A few days ago, I ripped the CD into .mp3 files using Windows Media Player. I have it set up to automatically do this when I insert a music CD into my PC.

I wanted the album to appear in Plex (What is Plex?) correctly so I could play it on Roku boxes, my Raspberry Pi/OSMC/Kodi media computer, or download it to smartphone for listening at the gym.

Usually, that happens with no further intervention needed. This time it didn’t.

On my phone

Smartphone. Click to enlarge.

This particular CD (issued in 1998 by Fantazmos Records in Frisco) was not recognized by WMP’s music database, so I had to name the .mp3 tracks, and manually add ID3 metadata tags to them. This I accomplished with freeware, Mp3tag. I had previously learned by trial-and-error plus Google which tags were important for the Plex server software on my PC to index the tracks properly.

In addition, I had to move the tracks from the two albums into separate folders, using Plex’ naming and organizing conventions on my PC.

Plex lets you add album art, a background, and the performers’ photo. I used part of Wesley’s ad for the background, and found the cover art online easily enough.

The screenshot at top shows you how it appears on our big TV. At right is a view on my wifi-only smartphone, showing the Dutch composers/performers.

Listen to samples of “Sonik Re-Entry” on the TTM “Fantastic Theatre” page. One features a voiceover by the original host, Josef Peter Hardt, created especially for David Bagsby’s “The Tulsa Project” CD!

OSMC 15.2

The free Open Source Media Center software installing on my $35 Raspberry Pi in the theater room.

Goodbye Raspbmc and XBMC, hello OSMC and Kodi!

I’d held off on the free software upgrade due to not wanting to lose my PleXBMC installation on Raspbmc “Gotham”, the last version of that software before it was superseded by OSMC this year. But some SD card/USB stick corruption issues suggested to me that the time was right to overcome my laziness.

The transition went smoothly yesterday. I again have access to all my DVR’d shows on a Windows Media Center computer by reinstalling the free ServerWMC add-on software. I also have a nice Plex client again on the Pi with a more recent version of the free PleXBMC add-on. (See previous post Windows Media Center & Raspberry Pi.)

By now, I have other well-functioning Plex clients on Roku boxes and Chromecast, as well as on smartphone and tablet. So it wouldn’t have been a crisis not to have Plex on the Pi; I just like the slick Raspbmc/OSMC interface that brings together TV, movies, music, internet radio, photos, and even a news crawl and Yahoo local weather.

Valuable and unique free TV content available through OSMC includes ESPN3 in HD, and CBSN, CBS’ new 24/7 online HD news channel. (Later note: the latter is also available on Roku, I discovered.)


Raspbmc was an adaptation of the Xbox Media Center (XBMC) software for the little Raspberry Pi computer. It was done by Sam Nazarko, then an 18-year-old student in the UK.

From http://kodi.wiki/view/OSMC:

“OSMC (short for Open Source Media Center) is a Linux distribution based on Debian that brings Kodi to a variety of devices. It is the successor to Raspbmc and Crystalbuntu.

“OSMC is an embedded, minimal, self updating Linux distributing which ships a Kodi front-end for a variety of devices. The project was founded by Sam Nazarko in 2014 and is maintained by a group of volunteers in their spare time.”

(For my own future reference, my Raspberry Pi 1 Model B is now on OSMC 2015.09-3 running Kodi 15.2, kernel: Linux 3.2.3-3-osmc Linux 4.2.3-3-osmc; PleXBMC 3.6.1, PleXBMC Helper 3.4.2, and ServerWMC 0.5.8.)


Sam Nazarko

Sam Nazarko

Back in July, I commented on TTM@Facebook: “Sam resembles Dr. Sheldon Cooper in appearance, but both Sam and OSMC are a lot more stable.”

Sam replied: “That.. made me laugh so much. Unfortunately you’re not the first person to suggest the similar appearance either…”

Congratulations, well done, Sam and company!

(Added 10/22/2015: See my new comment on previous post The missing context button for a new and easier way to restore that function to your remote.)

Plex client playing ATJ's 1st 3-hr show.

Plex app on a Galaxy Note II

I recently mentioned my free, PC-based DIY internet radio recorder, which I use to record an .mp3 of “All This Jazz” on KWGS @ 9pm Saturdays (now expanded to 3 hours).

In an earlier post, ‘All This Jazz’ in the home and on the run, I described how I used FTP to copy the show from my PC to a hand-me-down, wifi-only smartphone. I then plugged the phone into a radio in the kitchen or a boombox in the workout room to listen.

Now that my wife has moved up to an iPhone and an iPad, there is a better way. I am the proud owner of her old devices, a Galaxy Note II phone and a Google Nexus 7 tablet. Both are capable of running the free Plex client app, unlike the older smartphone.

Plex lets me stream the recorded show directly to the Note II from my laptop running free Plex Media Server software.

To celebrate the expansion of the show and the new devices, I spruced up Plex’ presentation by associating a photo of host Scott Gregory with the show name.

In addition, I can listen through a media room Raspberry Pi computer running PleXBMC software, or via the Plex channel on a Roku box or TiVo.

Even if I were at a Starbucks in Hong Kong, I could stream the show to either new device from our house using Plex. Pretty amazing.

Here is a new “All This Jazz”-related story I posted over on Tulsa TV Memories@Facebook:


Our nephew Jared (and also nephew Jordan) have been spending time at our house doing some scanning/archiving work for my wife. We added Jared’s preferred Pandora channels for his listening pleasure on TiVo. After he got tired of listening to what he wanted, he put it on Shuffle, which included my Pandora stations.

Lee Ritenour’s version of the Oliver Nelson jazz tune “Stolen Moments” came on at one point. I hadn’t heard my CD of it for years, so I found it and ripped it to one of our Plex Media Servers for later.

Since I had no handy liner notes while listening, I read the AllMusic review of the album and Lee’s followup, “Wes Bound” on my wifiphone. The reviewer snootily inquired why you should be listening to this when you could be listening to Wes Montgomery himself. I happen to like both Ritenour albums a lot, but was reminded of the monstrous Montgomery tune played on Scott Gregory’s All This Jazz show on KWGS a short time ago.

Since I save the shows and the playlists, I searched “Montgomery” on my PC with Agent Ransack and found that Wes’ stunning version of Coltrane’s “Impressions” was played at 11:08 pm on 5/23/2015. I listened to it again on my recording, and then bought “Smokin’ At The Half Note” on MP3 from Amazon.

What a guitarist! Disciplined, driving and musically brilliant. Wynton Kelly, Jimmy Cobb, and Paul Chambers made it a highly cohesive unit.

The musical journey started with Blake Shelton and ended with prime Wes Montgomery.

Albert the surf cat

Albert, as seen from above the Laz-E-Boy

Echoes_Waves

Albert, our neighbor’s cat, decided to cool off on my Laz-E-Boy chair in our media room today.

The ceiling fan was on, as was “Echoes of Nature: Ocean Waves”, an environmental recording on CD I had ripped to my laptop Windows 7 PC.

I used the Raspberry Pi computer running free PleXBMC software to pipe it in from the PC, in 6-channel stereo. I also put the album on continuous play.

He really seems to appreciate it.