Mohu (maker of indoor/outdoor antennas) created an online app that can help would-be cord-cutters figure out what they might need:

We launched Untangle.TV just four months ago after hearing from countless people that they want to cut the cord but feel overwhelmed by the process. We recognized that the desire to cut the cord is a no-brainer, but actually taking the step to do so can feel daunting.

From not knowing if you’ll be able to watch all the content you love to watch to confusion about the ever-growing list of streaming services, and do you need a streaming box or an antenna or whatever else. It’s a lot. But it doesn’t have to be that hard.

That’s where Untangle.TV comes in – it’s essentially a cord-cutting app. In a few short steps, it helps you figure out exactly how you can cut the cord.

Fortunately, people are starting to catch on that it can be made easier thanks to Untangle.TV. Even the Washington Post highlighted it as a key element in the cord cutting process.

Once you’re there, you’ll just need to answer a few quick questions, select your TV shows and channels you love to watch.answer a few quick questions, select your TV shows and channels you love to watch.

Then voila, the cord-cutting app will spit out a customized recommendation of the most ideal streaming services and devices needed to watch everything you want to watch without traditional cable or satellite TV.

This site can be a good place to start if you are at that point of wanting to shed the expense of cable/satellite, but not sure where to begin.

My own recommendation is to first get an indoor antenna at low cost, and play around with it to see how your reception is, and think about how much more TV you want or need (if any) than broadcast TV.

Custom “Reptilicus” Green skin for Windows Media Center, still working under Windows 10.

[11/26/2017: Windows 10 Fall 2017 Update notes at bottom]

This post will be of use to those interested in Windows Media Center software as a free DVR using a USB TV tuner, HDHomeRun device, or the like.

Microsoft stopped updating their Windows Media Center software after they introduced Windows 7. It is supposed to be incompatible with Windows 10. Eventually, Microsoft may move that functionality to Xbox.

However, some enterprising hobbyists figured out ways to install WMC and make it run anyhow.

The big Windows 10 [Spring 2017] Creators Update, now rolling out to users, breaks WMC, as did the previous major Anniversary Update.

But afterwards, WMC can be reinstalled, or installed for the first time with the special installer software.

WMC (which includes free program data downloads) hopefully should work until 2023 when Microsoft’s Windows 8.1 support is discontinued. (See previous post RIP Windows Media Center.)

I first used one of these installation methods to Add Windows Media Center to Win 10 on July 23, 2016. A couple of months later, this happened:

 Update, 10/4/2016:

My successful add of WMC to Win 10 was wiped out when my PC automatically received the Anniversary Update for Windows 10 Version 1607 on 9/24/2016. Tried a reinstall, but got an “Installing package failed, reverting…” message.

Using the WMC version 8.8.1 zip file and instructions in this post at MyDigitalLife, I was able to get WMC working again. You would need to create a login there to see the post.

WMC 8.8.1 has worked great.

But I recently got wind of another major Windows Update on its way, the Windows 10 [Spring 2017] Creators Update (Version 1703). If you want it early, you can make that happen by downloading the Update Assistant.

I checked recent posts on the MyDigitalLife forum and found that Creators Update does indeed break WMC. But the above-linked WMC 8.8.1 version can be successfully reinstalled after the Win 10 update.

Since I have two Win 10 PCs running WMC, I picked the faster quad-core PC for my first go.

No problems at all with the Creators Update. And all the WMC 8.8.1 files from last time were still there.

Here are my relevant notes:

Be current on Windows Update before starting with Creators Update.

If you use ServerWMC, note or take screenshots of your current settings, since you have to set up ServerWMC again from scratch. I had my pre-update PC to look at, so I didn’t need to do this.

If you already have WMC working, no need to uninstall it before Creators.

Also in that case, I recommend saving a copy of your current HOSTS file (C:\Windows\system32\drivers\etc\HOSTS). There are a couple of IP addresses at the bottom that enable WMC to download the free program guide data.

FYI, my HOSTS file contains the following lines that work in Tulsa (and possibly anywhere in the continental US):

After applying Creators Update, you can uninstall/reinstall an existing WMC 8.8.1 setup as follows:

  • In your 8.8.1 folder (mine is C:\WMC-V8.8.1), right-click Uninstaller.cmd and Run As Administrator. Then reboot.
  • Run _TestRights.cmd as Admin. You should see a command prompt window. (If you don’t, reboot and retry.)
  • Run either InstallerGREEN.cmd or InstallerBLUE.cmd as Admin. (Blue is the standard WMC color, green is custom.)
  • Check your HOSTS file and make sure IP addresses are there.

You do have to go through the setup process again for WMC.

If you should have problems with the program data download phase of setup, the IP addresses in your HOSTS file may be responsible. Do a Google search for “” to look for other IPs if yours or the ones I gave above don’t work for you.

I again used TightVNC viewer on my laptop to remotely do the update on my two headless (no monitor or keyboard) media PCs running TightVNC server.

No need to uninstall/reinstall any WMC-associated third-party programs such as ServerWMC, My Channel Logos, or Ceton My Media Center as I needed to do for the upgrade from Win 7 to Win 10.

Cribbing my settings from the other PC, I quickly re-set up ServerWMC. (Over there, it enables my Raspberry Pi to communicate with WMC; see previous post Windows Media Center & Raspberry Pi.) The other two third-party programs needed no attention.

Emby is a free application I use with ServerWMC on this quad-core PC to stream live or recorded TV programs to my smartphone or Roku (see previous post Watch live local TV anywhere via Emby app). All I needed to do on the Emby server software was to Refresh Guide Data.

Once I got all that working, I did my other Win 10 PC in blue.

Proving there is more than one way to skin a dinosaur. 😉

I created some of these logos for the Logitech Harmony 890 remote. Note the ancient NewsNow53 logo.

11/26/2017, Windows 10 Fall Creators Update:

Pretty much the same story as above, survived again.

Additional notes from this go-round:

  • Before the update occurred, I used BackupRestoreSettings.cmd in the WMC-V8.8.1 folder to save my settings. After uninstalling and reinstalling as before, ran this again to restore, worked perfectly and saved a lot of work restoring icons.
  • Also from the WMC-V8.8.1 folder, per the Read_Me notes, I ran the 8.7-8.8-QuickFix.reg as before after the restore.
  • You may need to again share your Recorded TV folder, wherever it is (mine is now C:\Users\Public\Video\Recorded TV).
  • In WMC, I had to update the location of the Recorded TV folder, and add a new one for an external drive of recorded TV I have since added to this PC. Once ServerWMC picks up these changes, Emby gets them too (Emby is now my primary reason for using WMC as a backend DVR and tuner; see previous post Watch live local TV anywhere via Emby app).
  • The same IP addresses in HOSTS file still keep the program data updating.

Sooner or later, WMC will break for good, but there is a group of people planning to keep it going: Windows 10 Media Center Community.

More about all this at The Green Button.

Until Spring 2018…

DIY: Cord-Cutting Q&A

Monday, May 08
7:00pm – 8:00pm
Hardesty Regional Library (east of S Memorial Dr on E 93rd St)
Oak Meeting Room

Rising TV costs getting you down? Mike Ransom, blogger on the topic of cord cutting, will help you learn about alternatives.

Ransom will discuss the pros and cons of over-the-air antenna TV and Internet streaming services such as Netflix, Hulu and Sling TV, and other ways you can “cut the cord” to cable or satellite and still enjoy your favorite programs. Bring your questions. Register online or call 918-549-7323.

I am also a weekly volunteer at Hardesty. Hope to see you there!

Raspberry Pi TV Time Machine

I just saw this cool little TV Time Machine project for the Raspberry Pi:

“For the innards, Wellington used a cannibalised thrift store Dell monitor, hooking it up to a Raspberry Pi 2 and some second-hand speakers. After the addition of Adafruit’s video looper code to loop free content downloaded from the Internet Archive, plus some 3D-printed channel and volume knobs, the TV Time Machine was complete.”

However, we already have a TV Time Machine that can play anything available on our TiVo Roamio OTA (over-the-air):

Broadcast television today is a retro paradise: MeTV, Antenna TV, GRIT, Comet, Heroes & Icons, GetTV, COZI, etc.

The TiVo also can provide DVR recordings, any show we have on Plex, anything on Netflix or Amazon.

Our TV Time Machine in action:

We run the HDMI output of our TiVo to our big TV in the den.

But a composite output is available as well.

I connected an X10 video sender unit to this output with an RCA cable (red, white, and yellow plugs).

Whatever is playing on TiVo in the den is transmitted via the sender to the video receiver unit in the guest room, which is attached to the 1983 TV set by a standard TV coax cable.

The den TV doesn’t need to be on.

[Above left: video sender unit in den; above right: video receiver unit in the guest room. The little curved rod is an IR extender, not needed here. It can be folded down.]

Control the den TiVo remotely from the guest room with the free TiVo phone app:

I try to keep the sender off when not in use because it jams part of the crowded 2.4 GHz band used by older wifi routers; see previous post Conflict between Wifi, X10 video sender.

The X10 receiver can be on all the time. The old TV is always set on channel 3.

(Video sender/receiver pair in the TTM aStore)

Since these devices are analog, the picture looks especially good on an old analog TV.

Next up: “Police Squad!”… IN COLOR

We have all 6 “Police Squad!” and all 49 “The Outer Limits” episodes on Plex.