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In our office: my old 1969 Sony AM/FM ST-80F stereo tuner & 1977 Kenwood KA 3500 amp, Select-A-Tenna & 1 of 2 white Realistic Minimus-7 speakers up top.

Here’s a nice way to spend a Memorial Day weekend afternoon.

KGGF-AM 690 is still a very old-fashioned radio station out of Coffeyville, Kansas. No online presence.

Tulsa is within its coverage area, but inside the house, I need a little help pulling it in.

This Select-A-Tenna connects directly by wire to the tuner. I bought this now-discontinued model from C. Crane Radio in the early 2000s.

Select-A-Tenna w/1964 Zenith Royal 40

It is also capable of working by induction without direct wired connection (see right), but this isn’t physically convenient with my tuner placement.

I simply dial 690 on the tuner, then fine tune the Select-A-Tenna. There is a big bump in the signal at a sweet spot on its dial.

KGGF carries Kansas City Royals baseball games, which is what I am now listening to.

Monday-Friday at 8:35-11 am, OpenLine (“the 4-state regions’ most popular and enduring radio program”) features news and sports plus a call-in show for people to sell stuff. This will really take you back.

You could imagine Herb Jepko and the Nightcaps coming on late in the evening. KVOO-AM in Tulsa carried this easy-going show for insomniacs 1969-71. (Link is to TTM comments and resources about Jepko)

Feels like the 1960s!


Later note:

I had to go out in the afternoon, so I tuned KGGF in the car.

On my radio, it sounded like an ionic storm howling in the background of the baseball game. Thinking of the 1960s, I noticed how many more wires and poles we have in the city today vs. yesterday.

My impression was that “the future” (today) was actively assaulting this remaining trace of a bygone era.

I may listen to a little OpenLine at home tomorrow morning. The prosaicness of the show is somehow comforting.

(Hmm, maybe that’s where the drug name Prozac came from.)

During the cord-cutting Q&A last week, the Tablo DVR device was mentioned.

Having gone with TiVo, I can’t speak from personal experience about it.

But it sounds like it could be a viable solution for OTA DVRing.

I made this comment about it:

“Yet another TiVo alternative, with 4 tuners! There is a $5 monthly charge for program guide data, but it is optional. Good low-cost choice if streaming content to other devices is important to you.”

The first and longest comment about it in the TTM Amazon aStore is a good and practical review of the product, and it was updated over a period of three years. The other two comments are useful, too:

Tablo 4-Tuner Digital Video Recorder for Over-The-Air HDTV with Wi-Fi for Live TV Streaming

Mohu (maker of indoor/outdoor antennas) created an online app that can help would-be cord-cutters figure out what they might need:

We launched Untangle.TV just four months ago after hearing from countless people that they want to cut the cord but feel overwhelmed by the process. We recognized that the desire to cut the cord is a no-brainer, but actually taking the step to do so can feel daunting.

From not knowing if you’ll be able to watch all the content you love to watch to confusion about the ever-growing list of streaming services, and do you need a streaming box or an antenna or whatever else. It’s a lot. But it doesn’t have to be that hard.

That’s where Untangle.TV comes in – it’s essentially a cord-cutting app. In a few short steps, it helps you figure out exactly how you can cut the cord.

Fortunately, people are starting to catch on that it can be made easier thanks to Untangle.TV. Even the Washington Post highlighted it as a key element in the cord cutting process.

Once you’re there, you’ll just need to answer a few quick questions, select your TV shows and channels you love to watch.answer a few quick questions, select your TV shows and channels you love to watch.

Then voila, the cord-cutting app will spit out a customized recommendation of the most ideal streaming services and devices needed to watch everything you want to watch without traditional cable or satellite TV.

This site can be a good place to start if you are at that point of wanting to shed the expense of cable/satellite, but not sure where to begin.

My own recommendation is to first get an indoor antenna at low cost, and play around with it to see how your reception is, and think about how much more TV you want or need (if any) than broadcast TV.

On Facebook, my brother Alan just posted a YouTube of violinist Stephane Grappelli and guitarist Diz Disley with the comment, “Maybe the ultimate Sunday ‘morning’ music for me.” This sent me on a quest yesterday.


Still have it.

One evening in 1979, on or after April Fool’s Day, I tuned in KWGS on my “new” 1969 Sony ST-80F AM/FM stereo tuner and happened onto some great acoustic jazz.

I fired up my reel-to-reel tape deck to capture it.

It turned out to be Grappelli and Disley, plus David Grisman doing the music he wrote for “King of the Gypsies” (1978) with Grappelli and Tony Rice. All but Grappelli were unknown to me at the time.

By June 2, 1984, I had transferred what I had recorded to cassette, editing out the between-song patter.

After seeing my bro’s Facebook post, I listened to my tape again and wondered if that radio show might be available anywhere. No luck commercially, then I found this blog post:

http://arizjones.blogspot.com/2011/03/stephane-grappelli-4-25-1978.html

An entire show was there for download, archived as two .rar files. The description sounded like what I taped:

This is a real nice recording with David Grisman and Tony Rice on the last five tracks.

Stephane Grappelli Group
04/25/1978
Great American Music Hall
San Francisco, CA
Soundboard > NPR radio

John Etheridge – guitar
Brian Toff – bass
Diz Disley – guitar
Stephane Grappelli – violin

Comparing it with my partial recording, the songs, arrangements, and ambience are the same, but the solos are different. Amazing to find an entire show from the same tour.

(By the way, according to Gary Chew, then Station Manager, KWGS’ first broadcast programming from NPR was in early December 1977.)

I used free 7-Zip to extract the 320 kbps .mp3 files from the .rar files.

I retitled each .mp3 with the song name. With free Mp3tag, I gave all the tracks the same Album Artist and Album name (these are key tags for Plex). I added track number tags and brief comments about content.

Mp3tag view after I finished. (Click  to enlarge)

Next I moved all the .mp3s into an “album” folder under a Stephane Grappelli folder for my Plex system, conforming to its naming and organizational conventions. Added art to Plex from the internet.

Live Stephane Grappelli 1978 NPR radio show now on my Plex system. (Click  to enlarge)

Now I can stream it to browser, smartphone, Roku or the Raspberry Pi.


Maybe my frequent playing of the tape in 1979 stuck in my brother’s mind, the sound having seeped through his bedroom wall. I like the result of this 38-year boomerang.

Detail of the “album”. (Click  to enlarge)